Pediatric Nutritionists Clovis NM

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James William Thomas, MD
(505) 784-5454
PO Box 90
Farwell, TX
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nutrition
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tx Med Branch Galveston, Galveston Tx 77550
Graduation Year: 1979

Data Provided By:
Kathryn Elaine Winters, MD
(505) 762-4455
912 W 21st St
Clovis, NM
Specialties
Pediatrics
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Wright State Univ Sch Of Med, Dayton Oh 45401
Graduation Year: 1982

Data Provided By:
Dr.Kathryn Winters
(575) 769-7577
2200 West 21st Street
Clovis, NM
Gender
F
Education
Medical School: Wright State Univ Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1982
Speciality
Pediatrician
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
4.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Dr. Khuram Arif
Clovis, NM
Specialty
Pediatrics

Dr. Justin Dale Bailey
(505) 784-3658
7704 Oklahoma Ct
Clovis, NM
Specialty
Pediatrics

La Fata Salvatore MD
(505) 762-4507
2020 Sheffield Drive
Clovis, NM
 
Blas Alfredo MD
(505) 762-9004
2301 North Thomas Street
Clovis, NM
 
Clovis Urology LLP
(505) 769-2689
2000 West 21st Street Suite W1
Clovis, NM
 
Dr. Leon Lin-Aung Yan
(510) 752-9069
Clovis, NM
Specialty
Pediatrics

David B Vickers, MD
(505) 762-4455
912 W 21st St
Clovis, NM
Specialties
Pediatrics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Tx Tech Univ Hlth Sci Ctr Sch Of Med, Lubbock Tx 79430
Graduation Year: 1996

Data Provided By:
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Making Learning Relevant

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Check out these lessons and worksheets to help make nutrition relevant to students.

Food Persuasion Lesson »

Cereal Sleuths Worksheet »

Be Wary of Words Worksheet »

What it Really Means Worksheet »

With time, educators learn techniques for teaching material in ways that will better help students learn. Relating lessons to students’ backgrounds and/or interests is a strategy to help students retain the information because it is relevant to them. This can be challenging with a classroom full of students each with a different background and varied interests. Using interactive lessons is a way to hold the students’ attention, help them retain information, and give them a desire to learn more.

Making Nutrition Relevant

Taken from www.choosemyplate.gov Taken from www.choosemyplate.govUnited States Department of Agriculture (USDA) food guides have been in use as far back as 1916. Over the years the guides have become more sophisticated and incorporate more components such as serving sizes and physical activity recommendations. In 2005 as overweight and obesity rates continued to rise, the illustration of the food pyramid was simplified. The word “My” was added to the title to make the pyramid more personalized. These changes make the information more relevant to the users by taking into consideration factors affecting our diets including busy schedules, television advertisements, and the ease of drive-thrus with numerous extra large sized options.

The recent change from the “MyPyramid” icon to “MyPlate” is another example of making information relevant to the target audience by using the image of something we all know. After 19 years of making nutritious choices based on a pyramid, the guide is now based on a plate although much of the information remains the same between these two tools. The “MyPlate” campaign focuses on portion sizes and the contents of those portions. Half of the plate should be covered with fruits and vegetables. The remaining half of ...

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