Children's Gardening Tools Fairmont WV

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Gardening Tools. You will find informative articles about Gardening Tools, including "Asexual Propagation". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Fairmont, WV that can help answer your questions about Gardening Tools.

Meadowflower Greenhouse
(304) 825-7001
Rt.1, Box 233 East Run Road
Farmington, WV
Products / Services
Annuals

Data Provided By:
Hillside Florist & Greenhouse
(304) 291-0363
1736 Grafton Rd
Morgantown, WV

Data Provided By:
Gritt's Midway Greenhouse
(304) 586-2449
Route 2 Box 213
Red House, WV
Products / Services
Vegetables

Data Provided By:
Mary's Greenhouse
(304) 636-2199
300 Ward Ave.
Elkins, WV
Products / Services
Greenhouse Growers, Groundcovers, Perennials, Plants, Shrubs, Trees

Data Provided By:
Masontown Block And Precast
(304) 864-5871
Rte 7
Masontown, WV

Data Provided By:
Biafore Landscape Development L.L.C.
(304) 594-3006
522 Ashebrooke Square
Morgantown, WV
Products / Services
Arborist Services, Business Services, Fencing / Gates, Furniture / Structures, Gardening Supplies, Grading Services, Groundcovers, Hardscape Supplies, Horticulture Companies, Industry Supplies & Services, Irrigation Services, Landscape Architects, Landscape Contractors, Landscape Design, Landscape Maintenance, Landscape Maintenance / Services, Landscape Supplies, Landscaping Services, Lawn Care Services, Lighting Services, Mulch, Mulch Installation, Nursery Supplies, Patio, Wall, Walkway & De…

Data Provided By:
Almost Heaven Hydroponics
(304) 598-5911
3476 University Ave.
Morgantown, WV
Products / Services
Hi-Tech/Organic Garden Shop

Half Way Market
(304) 743-9642
1213 E Us Route 60
Milton, WV
Products / Services
Annuals

Data Provided By:
Terra Salis Garden Center
(304) 925-4754
Route 60 E
Malden, WV
Products / Services
Annuals, Bulbs, Chemicals, Crop Protection, Garden Center Marketing, Garden Centers / Nurseries, Garden Ornaments, Groundcovers, Horticulture Companies, Mulch, Perennials, Pest Control Supplies, Plants, Roses, Seeds, Shrubs, Trees

Data Provided By:
Friends Hill Greenhouse
(304) 358-2715
Po Box 811
Franklin, WV

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Asexual Propagation

Both plants and people can propagate through sexual reproduction, but obviously, this isn't true of asexual propagation: A severed human toe doesn't sprout a new person, nor does the person sprout a new toe!

Here we'll describe the most common types of asexual propagation methods used in the classroom setting: cuttings and division.

Cuttings

Taking a cutting involves removing a piece of a leaf, stem or root and placing it in a growing medium where it then develops the other parts that it left behind (i.e., a stem will then grow roots, a root will then grow a stem).

Rates of success with cuttings generally are lower than seed germination rates. For the best chance of success:

Take cuttings with clean instruments Place them in moist, sterile, soilless potting mix Choose plants that root easily (see table below)

Cuttings of some plants root easily in vases of water, but others will rot before making roots if you place them directly in water. Pot those stem cuttings, as well as any root and leaf cuttings, in soilless potting mix. Listed in the table below are plants that grow well from cuttings and should provide you with a good success rate even in tough classroom conditions.

Plant Plant Part Propagation Medium
Coleus stem water or soil
pothos ivy stem water or soil
geranium stem water or soil
African violet leaf or stem, soil
jade plant stem or leaf soil
English ivy stem water or soil
wandering Jew stem water or soil
Taking Cuttings

Have your rooting medium set up before taking cuttings. Use clean scissors and make sure that each cutting measures 4 to 6 inches long and has at least 4 leaves. Remove the bottom leaves from the cutting and immediately insert it in water or soil.

Caring for Cuttings

Cuttings need high humidity and warm temperatures to help them grow. Nursery professionals have mist beds that spray cuttings intermittently throughout the day to keep humidity high. You can create a similar effect by creating a tent with clear plastic wrap and then misting cuttings throughout the day with a spray bottle to keep the soil and the air around the cutting moist -- but not soaking wet. To make the tent, prop the plastic wrap off the surface of the planting mix and plant parts using popscicle sticks or other 'posts.' As soon as your plants establish a few roots (you can check by very gently tugging on the cutting to see if there is any resistance) you can remove moisture tents.  You'll need to experiment to find the perfect balance for the humidity levels in your classroom.

Most of the plants listed in the table above root within a few weeks, but cuttings of some plants can take weeks or even months to develop the missing parts. Monitor plants regularly to check on progress. Are new leaves appearing? If the cutting is in water, can you see roots growing?

Further exploration: If your students have ever planted potato tubers, they'...

Click here to read the rest of this article from KidsGardening


 
 

 

Copyright © 2010 National Gardening Association     |     www.kidsgardening.org & www.garden.org      |     Created on 03/15/99, last updated on 11/11/10